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Tour management

Travelling planning  for Tours

Personal calendar for
all bandmembers

Manage your
venue information

Organize
your guestlist

Centralize your
band riders

Best Tour  Management

The best tour managers are well-prepared for the issues and crises that sometimes arise on tour, and deal with them resourcefully and efficiently.
Tour managers travel with musicians and crew members on touring journeys that can span the globe and last for months. Their job is to make sure everything runs smoothly, which usually means arranging travel plans, coordinating with venues, managing money, facilitating media interactions, and scoping out local services at each tour stop.

Interpersonal  Skills

Tour managers must be excellent multitaskers with terrific time management and organizational skills. Being proactive and making the most of downtime (e.g., while traveling between tour stops) is extremely important to staying on top of work. The best tour managers are well-prepared for the issues and crises that sometimes arise on tour, and deal with them resourcefully and efficiently. They should also be capable of handling interpersonal conflicts—which occur frequently on tour—with grace.

The best tour managers are  well-prepared

Career Path

Some tour managers start out as musicians or concert techs; others have experience as festival staff, booking agents, promoters, or live sound engineers, or in similar live-music roles. With experience, connections, and a reputation for good work, tour managers can advance to better-paying jobs with more prominent bands and artists, or join the ranks of a record label or concert promotion company.

Work Life

It’s easy to forget that managing a tour means going on tour oneself. Just like the musicians and crew members they manage, tour managers spend hours riding in cars, buses, and/or planes, work long days that continue well into the night, and sleep in hotels and motels in unfamiliar cities.